Sunday, December 28, 2008

Statistics not my thing but...

Check these out:

High School

  • Over 25% of Latino men 25 and over in the United States have less than a 9th grade education, compared to 7% of all males in the United States. [U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, March 2004, Ethnic and Hispanic Statistics Branch, Population Division]
  • Only 57% of Latino males 25 and over had a high school diploma, compared to 90% of white, non-Hispanics, and 83% of all other non-Hispanics. [U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, March 2004, Ethnic and Hispanic Statistics Branch, Population Division]
  • Latino males are much more likely to drop out of high school than other males. In 2004, 29% of Latino males 18 to 24 years old were high school dropouts, compared to 7% of white males and 14% of black males. [National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 2005, Tables 105]

College Enrollment

  • While Latino male enrollment in higher education has increased, female enrollment has increased even more rapidly. Latino male enrollment in higher education increased 255% between 1976 and 2004 compared to over 510% for females. [National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 2005, Tables 205]
  • Latino male representation in higher education has changed. In 1976, Latino males represented 55% of Latinos in higher education. In 2004, 41% of all Latinos enrolled in higher education were male. [National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), Institutional Postsecondary Education Data Survey (IPEDS) 2003-04]

Financial Aid

  • In 2003-04, 62% of Latino male undergraduates received some form of financial aid to pay for college with an average award combining grants, loans, and work-study of $6,870. [National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), National Postsecondary Aid Study (NPSAS) 2003-04: Undergraduates survey]
  • Latino males were slightly less likely to receive financial aid to pay for college than Latino females. However, males generally received either similar or higher average awards than Latino women in 2003-04, depending on the type of institution where they enrolled. [National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), National Postsecondary Aid Study (NPSAS) 2003-04: Undergraduates survey]

College Completion

  • Only 12% of Latinos 25 and over have earned a bachelor's degree or higher level of education, compared to 30% of all males 25 and over. [U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, March 2002, Ethnic and Hispanic Statistics Branch, Population Division]
  • Latinos 25 and over have similar college attainment rates by gender. However, Latino males under 25 have lower attainment rates than females. In 2004, males under 25 represented 39% of all Latinos awarded bachelor's degrees. [U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, 2004, Ethnic and Hispanic Statistics Branch, Population Division, Table 6.1; CPS, October 2004, Table 1]
  • The number of Latino males earning college degrees is increasing, but this number has increased more quickly for females. Between 1976 and 2004, the number of Latino males earning bachelor's degrees increased 260% while females increased 580%. [National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 2005, Tables 261, 264, 267, 270, 273.]
  • The top 3 degree areas for undergraduate Latino males were social sciences, business, and engineering.
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